Archives For wong kar-wai

Flavorwire.com made a video titled 135 Shots That Will Restore Your Faith in Cinema, after asking their readers what were “the most beautiful movies ever made.” The result is okay, I guess. I still don’t think that I’m as moved by Terrence Malick films as others are…

There was also some Zhang Yimou and Wong Kar-wai added in there, alongside Darren Aronofsky’s The Fountain — which was one of my picks for most iconic movie images. xD

In any case, there was some Noboru Shinoda (and therefore, Shunji Iwai) missing. The Hana & Alice ballet scene [1], just as Love Letter, as well as EVERYTHING on Picnic [1], and every single frame in All About Lily Chou Chou — they’re all perfect. LOL

I don’t watch as much i.Sat as I used to, but this is my favorite commercial I’ve seen from them.

I’m so glad they have it on their YouTube account. xD

I literally burst out laughing when I saw this on the DVD

It’s supposed to be a deleted scene from In the Mood for Love — understandable considering it totally kills that moody setting throughout the whole thing. But the part of me that laughed heartly would have loved it included…

Going through my last batch of DVDs to arrive, there’s some pretty kick-ass extras in the Criterion edition of In the Mood for Love. And why wouldn’t there be, right? It’s Criterion! Listen to Tony Leung and Maggie Cheung speaking in English is… something else. xD

There’s a quote from an essay included in the DVD that struck a chord and wanted to share

As an African-American singing in Spanish, [Nat King] Cole embodies American Culture’s ability to absorb, transform, and commodify the exotic for its own ends. In other words, America takes from the world and sells what it has borrowed back to those from whom it was taken.

In the Mood for Love
Hong Kong, 1960s Introduction
Romance and the “Yellow Peril”: Race, Sex and Discursive Strategies in Hollywood Fiction by Gina Marchetti

Amazon.com | Google Books

Bam! I’m into making lists now. xD

To push distributors, and tickle their curiosity, as well as showing them it can also be good business to bring Asian flicks. Plus, cinephiles would love a little more variety in their local theaters, and I bet regular moviegoers wouldn’t mind one or two non-Hollywood blockbusters… after all, we already watch everything subtitled! We don’t have an issue with them like some… other… people.

If Americans (and Canadians) complain about the little variety of Asian films outside martial arts, or auteur cinema – well, really. Stop complaining. It’s even worse down here. If you got 5 releases a year (just an assumption), then we get one… if we’re lucky. Sorry, I’m not so campy with J-horror… I’m a little tired. I must be too old for it now. LOL

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