Archives For paper

What’s more awesome than just animation? And origami? How about origami-animation? Japanese tissue manufacturer Nepia has a short commercial/PSA/short showcasing origami animals and some stop-motion.

Creative director: Jin Sato (佐藤仁)
Copyrighter: Ochi Kazuyoshi (越智一仁)
Producer: Takuo Ozawa (小澤卓男), Yasuhiro Kawasaki (川崎泰広)
Director: Arai Fuyu (新井風愉)
Production manager: Takasugi Makoto (高杉誠)
Stop-motion animation: Ohno Motoki (おーのもとき)
Camera: Chiyoe Sugita (杉田知洋江)
Camera assistant: Mahiro Shintani (新谷真博)
Lights: HIGASIX
Lights assistant: Tomoya Yoshimura (吉村知弥)
Art: Kiyomi Tokita (鴇田清美), Takanori Saito (斉藤貴教), Shizuka Masaki (正木静香)
Editor: Maho Inamoto (稲本真帆)
Music: Mituru Samejima (鮫島充)
Sound effects: Yoshiaki Tokunaga (徳永義明)

For a few couple of years already, people have been calling on the death of printed paper. And in all honesty, I rarely print stuff for myself — a vast majority of printed documents refer to letterhead letters, which I usually just send on PDF by email. But if I’m printing something, it’s got something to do with branded documentation.

We’ve talked about e-paper [1], digital newspapers, and Samsung’s flexible screens [1] are coming. People are supposedly using smartphones and are all over iPads, as sales for PCs are down dramatically as times flies by. Yet, people apparently still print stuff. At least that’s the premise for this project:

For a long time, people have been playing around with interactive tables [1][2][3][4][5], though I don’t know anyone who can afford one. The guys from Fujitsu Laboratories seem to be aiming at consumer-range products. And though it may sound and look cool that you can turn all your printed documents into something digital and interact with it, wouldn’t it mean that your page with video included has already been digitally design?

There’s digital pop-up books!

creative-sandbox

Of course, there ARE elements in our everyday life that aren’t digital — doodled post-it notes (I can’t think of anything else other than notes). The rest, they wouldn’t have been embedded elements on your digital source document. The question is, why print it?

I want this (Dutch???) toilet paper!

The best toilet paper commercials we ever got in Peru were of Suave, featuring Luis Miguel’s hit song, Suave [MV] — that’s the only one that ever stuck in my subconscious anyway. That one, for the song, and there was another one of a little girl who wanted to go to the washroom at a mall or something, and she was only with her father. Obviously, he couldn’t go it to the ladies room, so she went in with her father staying by the door giving directions, where he spurts “ahora limpiate tu potito.” (now clean your tushy).

We aren’t any remotely close to having this kind of toilet paper commercial.

No effing WAY.

And the most important thing:

The Cardboard Bicycle can withstand water and humidity, coated with a strong layer of brown and white material, making the finished product look like it is made of hard lightweight plastic and can carry riders weighing up to 220 kilograms. The cost to make the bicycle is around $9-$12 and the manufacturer expects that the cost to the consumer would be around $60-$90 depending on what parts they choose to add on. – source

Water-resistant, light, and cheap? O_O

I’ll pay $90 for that bike. xD

Not only is China conquering Olympic gold, but apparently animation school over there is taking huge leaps compared to what actually was/is — Legend of a Rabbit, I’m looking at you [1].

Until I ran into this link to YinYueTai on Weibo.

Here comes Zhang Zhe (张喆) — I can tell these Mandarin classes are paying off — whose animation, titled Paper War (纸片战记), is of the mixed media kind and took 9-freaking-months to make at The Animation and Digital Arts School of the Communication University of China (中国传媒大学).

You can check some posts on Peruvian animation~

Page 1 of 3123