Archives For movie classics

greta-garbo

There is only one thing to say… THANK YOU SO MUCH, Julz!!!!! I just got it in the mail today, and the post office almost spoiled it, because they were about to rip the wrapping to find out what it was! And I was like NO! Can’t you just read the invoice to see what’s inside, plus it’s a gift, you damn fuckers! LOL’ – They looked at me funny because you won’t believe how EXCITED I got when I knew. You could see it in my eyes, Julz – this has been the most surprising, bestest present like EVER… FOREVER AND EVER and always~~~

Hardcover books rock, photography rocks, celebrity portraits rock… so this gift effing rocks!! It’s got sooooo many photographs, and they are all neatly printed on nice paper. My dad even thought they might be real pictures pasted on the paper, haha. Big font for the content, so no need for eye-squinting… and the first chapter, if I read correctly – it’s written by Garbo’s great-nephew. I thought it was such a great read! Here’s an excerpt:

There is a lot about Greta Garbo I did not learn until after she passed away. Her last film was released in 1941, seventeen years before I was born. Until I was a teenager, she was just “Kata.” This was the nickname she was given as a child – after Swedish suffragette Kata Dalstrom – presumably for her strong will.

Kata was my great aunt. Of all my relatives, she was one of my favorites, beloved by my brothers and sisters as well. I remember the times we spent together with a smile. I recall her sidelong glances and her raised eyebrows as her stories were spun to the next level of impossibility. Kata had a great sense of humor, and there were always jokes when she was around. In New Jersey, we accompanied her on long walks and once built a bonfire that could be seen for several blocks. Kata taught me and my siblings how to do cartwheels. She was distressed that we had not learned to do them properly, and we spent a memorable afternoon refining our technique under her critical eye. Kata was an intriguing combination of seriousness and fun.

Garbo – Portraits from her Private Collection – II – A Portrait of Garbo by Scott Reisfield p.26

So… people knowing me would know a while back I saw The Greta Garbo Collection, which I loved! Especially watching Queen Christina and Camille! Though my surprise came when I saw Grand Hotel, and was taken away from Garbo’s famous line of “I want to be alone” by the sharply-delivered-lines of Joan Crawford. Now, I’m done watching my Joan Crawford Collection.

I loved watching it, especially The Women and Mildred Pierce… and Possessed… and yeah, most of it, really! On the side, I also saw Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? – Man! That film is freaky~~~ All recommended!

So, yeah~ back on the topic. Why am I fascinated by these two seemingly different actresses? One gave up almost everything in her life for her much wanted privacy… and never really got it because paparazzi still followed her around. The other lived to be a star, and took it as it came… even the bad publicity, and still held her head high!

My respect to both of them. Nowadays, it is so hard to find stars like them. Most of them just complain about the paparazzi, and talk about their wanting privacy… but never really truly wanting it. Nights of wild partying, drugs and fights… and don’t forget the crotch shots! You’ve never seen Hollywood so unglamorous… such a shame.

I am of the opinion that we should get rid of Hollywood Ebola soon before it’s too late.

Nicole Kidman as SatineMoulin Rouge is one of my favorite films because of its soundtrack, art direction, choreography, and overall production ++ plus it’s an idealistic angsty story about a courtesan and a pennyless writer who fall in love in the midst of the Bohemian revolution that swept Paris.

Freedom. Beauty. Trust. And above all things, Love.

Nicole Kidman is great in the film, as well as Ewan McGregor and John Leguizamo. Zidler and The Duke are excellent, especially in the “Like A Virgin” musical number. It is very hard not to like and enjoy this film, unless… of course, you don’t like Musicals at all.

Recently, I got my Greta Garbo collection, which includes 10 discs, and over 12 films – which kicks ass. I’m in the third disc, and just finished watching Camille, both the 1921 Silent Film and Greta Garbo’s.

First of all, Garbo was excellent in this film, especially in the last act. And although the Silent version might have been great in its time, I think the story loses subtlety without dialog an the exaggerated facial expressions. That’s why I prefer the 1936 version better ^^

It is such a pity that Garbo was competing against Vivian Leigh, who won the Best Actress Academy Award for Gone with the Wind that same year. Marguerite, just as Satine in Moulin Rouge, is a courtesan who doesn’t believe in True Love, and instead trades her love for diamonds and bracelets, until she mistakes mid-class Armand Duval for a rich Count.

Camille