Archives For milk@coffee

If you know me, you probably wouldn’t think that I’d be a fan of Milk@Coffee, why? Because Milk@Coffee is happy poppy simple music. My friends think it sounds like children’s music. Obviously, they have that certain vibe because the female part of this duo, Kiki, sounds like a little kid singing, and the music in itself sounds very playful and catchy. However, looking into the songs, they reveal a certain maturity.

Of course you’ve got catchy favorites like Wo Bu Shi Rock n’ Roll (I’m not Rock n’ Roll), the wacky Curry Coffee, or Burn! Little Universe, and Yi Qi Lai (Together). However, there’s also songs like The Older the Lonelier – you gotta admit that’s a really REALLY sad title – or Accustomed to Loneliness. How about the most off-beat of their songs? The Zhongguo Feng-styled (traditional Chinese sounding) Die Lian Hua.

In this new single titled No Time — the album will be out by September… in a mayor label, so Milk@Coffee is no longer indie –, they seemed to have struck a balance with that maturity and the catchy. Yes, No Time sounds like a kid’s song, but it talks about a thing kids will never mind until they grow up a bit. How many of you keep telling the people you know that you don’t have enough time to do something. It’s a tale as old as… well, time.

The begins with a minute of various celebrities saying what they lack time for.  “I am __” they say, “I have no time for ____”.  These neglected activities include listening to music, dating, losing weight, studying abroad, visiting relatives,  having kids, and so many other commonplace ones that every listener should hear one they too pushed back at one point. The spoken introduction ends abruptly with Laure Shang saying: “My name is Shang Wenjie. I have no time to record whatever this is for you”.

via Cfensi.

In an effort to attract more Western musicians and firms, China is building three national music industry parks, serving as performance stages and platforms where musicians from around the world could get together to collaborate, located in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangdong.

But of course, in order to attract Western musicians and firms, they need to tackle piracy.

With programs like the ones 88TC88.com [musicdish.com] are offering for Western acts to get packages translated into Chinese to enter the market, the government is trying to develop a system that will not only help artists get their royalties, but also protect Chinese arts.

Until relatively recently, copyright in China was illegal. All intellectual property belonged to the people, ie. government. If you wrote a book for example, the government would ‘own’ it and reap any ‘profits,’ while providing the author with a salary, housing, medical and education. So when some rant on about piracy or the lack of enforcement, this should be put in context. The Copyright Law of the People’s Republic of China was adopted in 1990 – we in the US on the other hand have had a Copyright Act on the books since 1790 and we still can’t seem to get it right!

On the other hand, the government does often seem capricious in its enforcement of copyright. They like to point to last year’s shutdown of 200 pirate movie sites, including the largest video BitTorrent site. It just so happens though that the crackdown coincided oh so nicely with the launch of CCTV’s major online video initiative. Nor is it clears whether the shutdown didn’t have more to do with fighting pornography – a much bigger taboo for the government – rather than piracy. Having said that though, the fact is that for both economic and diplomatic/political reasons, the Chinese government will increasingly get serious, get tough and tackle the IP issue in the broad sense, not just piracy.

What’s gonna be their system?

The Chinese government will use watermarking technology to embed a unique code into every creative works released – music, film, graphic,… – allowing the government to easily identify, fine and shut down websites peddling pirated material as well as track all plays for royalty collection and disbursement.

all via MusicDish.

Which is already happening when you upload things on YouTube or some file sharing website. Things get deleted, and accounts get shut down. However, coming from China. This is huge.

Look, I am all for China protecting its artists, as long as me as a user NOT in China, is able to have access to their content. I listen to a lot of music in Chinese, which I wouldn’t be doing if it weren’t for illegal downloads in the first place. I wouldn’t own albums by LeeHom Wang, or all of Bibi’s discography if I hadn’t downloaded their albums.

I wouldn’t know about Yuguo or Chang Shilei or Milk @ Coffee.

You know, I use Haoting to stream music now, but some of the artists I just named don’t even show up there. Also, you guys… it would be really awesome if there was an option for language. LOL

Okay, having said that~ I know I support downloads, but I also support paying for the stuff YOU consider to be good. I am not telling you what you should pay for, but I want you to make a conscious decision about paying for the content you deem good enough for your money. If you think such star or group is the best, and that they/he/she deserves your money, make an effort to buy anything by them. It doesn’t have to be the $30 USD import album, it can be the $15 USD poster.

Please, do not tell me this album by this artist is the best of all time, if you haven’t paid for it. If you love it that much, you should buy it… unless it’s already out of print, of course. Don’t tell me this movie is a film that changed your life, if you have it as a pirated copy. You don’t have to have a 100 disc collection, but if you really think that piece of art… being anything from music, to movies or photographs or sculptures… if they made a difference to you, please buy it.

Asian Music Round-up

March 28, 2010 — 12 Comments

27 Asian Music Albums OWNED. [One, Mirotic… thanks Julz~]

That’s like 50 regular Western music albums in price… just so you know.

Over 240 Asian Music Albums HEARD…

it’s been 2 busy years of Asian Entertainment…
and I can’t seem to stop~

musicians and idols~ I can’t hate any of them…
and they’re making me broke xD

To keep things interesting, I’ve decided to switch to the newest songs that made the best 100 songs of the decade. Just the heads up, it turned out to be very Asian. Is it trying to tell you something?

One of those examples was the Welcome to Beijing song, which had a HUGE bunch of Asian (mostly Chinese, Taiwan and Hong Kong) stars. The scale of the project is probably similar to (or even bigger than) Michael Jackson’s We Are the World song… which in its time was epic. To me, and to many Asian (and non-Asian) people who keep track of the Asian music industry it marked an important time. Not only did the Olympics opened China to the world… and the world to China, but it also felt like a huge switch on everything from basic economics, industry… and entertainment.

It’s as if Chinese musicians had been enclosed all those years while the economy started to pick up, and have exploded with a huge fireball of creativity. It’s amazing at the amount of talent coming out from there, especially now that they can upload their music through the many Chinese music websites like douban.com and haoting.com, and the amount of blogs and communities that are reporting on them.

Some really awesome music, which I have already blog in this place. This is the reason, I want to get over these ones first, before I post many other songs from 2002-2006 when I didn’t blog that much (or at all).

Continue Reading…

Been backing up stuff, so a lot of stuff seems to have dead links.
cannot think about the time to format. O.o

Just finished moving all my music (because that’s the easiest to move).
know some of them? xD teehee, predominantly Chinese and overall Asian-ness~~~ xD

iTunes - Dec 2009