Archives For movie classics

Fox Series Latino finally aired the final episode of Ryan Murphy’s Feud with Joan Crawford and Bette Davis, and feelings were had~

I’ve been a huge Crawford admirer for many years now, and I’m so glad that there are people who have begun seeing her as something more than Wire Hangers Campy Crawford. Murphy, himself, enjoys Crawford’s campy self [1], and I do too, but I’m so happy we’re seeing her as something more. Jessica Lange’s isn’t exactly Joan Crawford, but her Lucille Le Sueur was pitch perfect.

I was secretly looking forward to my Letterboxd Year in Review newsletter :P Compared to last year, my hours watched dropped in a staggering 32% yo! And it’s not even because I’ve been watching shorter movies LOL The total number of movies watched also dropped around 32% (31.89%). I still haven’t decided whether that’s because I got obsessed over Mamamoo or because I got caught up with work.

This year I made it a point to brush up on my Chinese cinema, but it doesn’t make sense that Johnnie To is my most-watched director because I can only recall watching 2 movies of his last year — Office in early January and Mad Detective was my last watch — LOL Oh, nevermind, I also watched Three xD which matched the three other movies I saw in 2015. And yeah, Anna May Wong was definitely my Most Watched Actor with 7 titles— The Thief of Bagdad, ImpactThe Toll of the SeaA Study in ScarletDaughter of the DragonBombs Over Burma, and Lady from Chungking.

The movie-watching also got very influenced with the #52FilmsByWomen project [1][2][3].

My 2017 didn’t start off with a bang, so I’m just hoping to match my 2016 record~

There’s a really really great article on Joan Crawford talking about the harm that Mommy Dearest (film and movie) did to her legacy, notable films and how unfairly we may have judged her considering how we don’t judge her male counterparts for maybe committing some of the same mistakes as parents.

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Head over to RogerEbert.com

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You cannot kill me. You cannot kill China. Not even a million deaths could crush the soul of China, for the soul of China is eternal. When I die, a million will take my place, and nothing can stop them, neither hunger nor torture nor the firing squad.

We shall live on until the enemy is driven back over scorched land and the armies of decency and liberty are on the march. China’s destiny is victory. It will live because human freedom will not perish. Out of the ashes of ruin and old hatreds, the force of peace will prevail until the world is again sane and beautiful.

This quote is taken from Robert L. McLaughlin and Sally E. Parry’s We’ll Always Have the Movies: American Cinema during World War II because the audio of Lady from Chungking isn’t very clear.

I don’t know what they’re waiting for to make an Anna May Wong biopic with Tang Wei, and Joan Chen as director.

I’ll champion anything Vidya does. This goes hand in hand with her Mother India cover!

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