Archives For contemporary classics

Shunji Iwai’s neo-classical romance, Love Letter, about the woman who wrote letters to her deceased lover and got responses back, is over 20 years old now since its release. However, its mark as a pop culture reference across Asia is undeniable. In its time, the film made actress Miho Nakayama a household name, and it launched Shunji Iwai’s filmmaking career (and hence has given us: Ayumi Ito and Yu Aoi).

The film’s style and cinematography, courtesy of Noboru Shinoda (RIP) has inspired countless of filmmakers across East Asia who have headed to Otaru (小樽市) or other similar snowy places to capture the essence of the film [cue: 张一白 Zhang Yibai’s segment in Run for Love (奔爱), which featured Eddie Peng and Zhang Ziyi], and the classic (though simple) quote of “o-genki desuka?” (お元気ですか?) [1] has been referenced in various places…

Just look at the members of -relatively new- Kpop group G-FRIEND, who played a round of movie quotes to decide who would be the host of that specific One Fine Day episode’s segment (10 months after their debut). The group is formed by 6 young women, all who were born post-95. In fact, eldest member (and leader of the group), Sowon, was born almost 8 months after the release of Love Letter. But it is member Yuju (’97) who first references the movie with the knowledge of all the group.

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So if you put your hands close together to shout out the words “o-genki desuka?” and the person in front answers back the same way with a “atashi genki desu.” That’s a Shunji Iwai shout-out to ya~

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So I finally re-watched Inside Out in Original English audio track, and the feelings for Bing Bong were more real than ever. When I originally went to the theater to catch it in one of the late at night shows, it was still presented in Spanish dub and parents with children were still there. One of them parents ruined the movie for me when, at the moment of said tears, his daughter (seating behind us) began to tear up. He did what parents shouldn’t do—- he shamed his kid saying “why are you crying? Is this a scary movie?

Eff you, dad. Let your kid cry, it’s a freaking emotional scene in the movie. And who the eff cries in scary movies? Se dice “ya pasó, ya pasó” so you can calm your kid down.

Really makes me think of never ever going to big movies because people can ruin your experience.

My only ever memory of Enchanted was that when it finally opened in Lima, it was only presented in its Latino dub version and I was pissed. I didn’t watch it at the cinema because I refused to watch Amy Adams dubbed, and my doubts were confirmed when I tested the Latino audio on the DVD. xD

I love the movie so much- the throwback, the modern spin on the princess story, the music and everything that I’ve seen it a number of times on my own DVD, I sometimes re-watch it when I catch it on TV, and I may or may have not watched the Japanese dub on the plane from Japan back home. However, my favorite scene in the whole movie definitely is the “you make me so angry” bit because it pushes the movie out of the Disney comfort zone without ever leaving it, and it’s perfect. It changes Giselle from Disney princess to actual modern-day woman within the Disney universe constrains.

All the feels. In here and in the So Close number. And Giselle saves Robert. Most awesome princess movie.

I can’t believe it’s been ten years since~ To celebrate, Studio 4C is publishing a Tekkonkinkreet Artbook. 100 copies (which are already gone) signed by director Michael Arias. Another 292 copies that will come with a hand-drawn slip in between the book. Both priced at Y2980 JPY (at around $26 USD at current exchange rate). The shipping to South America is more expensive than that xD

Anyway~ for those interested; here’s the LINK.

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Kuro, when the sky turns black why do I feel so blue?

*update*

Also in 日本語!

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クロ、空の色が黒くなってくるとさ、なんだかシロは悲しい気持ちになるの、どして?

Yeh Dil Vole! xD

Anyone who’ve seen both Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s 1996 directorial debut Khamoshi: The Musical (Silence: The Musical) and last year’s Belgian-French La Famille Bélier -by Eric Lartigau- can spot the similarities between the two (as well as the 1996 German film Beyond Silence (Jenseits der Stille) by Caroline Link). You can even spot the similar plot points by either reading the outline or watching the trailer.

In the pivotal emotional punch of the movie, the daughter (played by Manisha Koirala and Louane Emera respectively) auditions to the coveted singing position, when her (deaf) parents -who had been against the idea- show up to see their daughter perform both vocally and in sign language. Koirala (voiced by playback singer Kavita Krishnamurthy) doing Yeh Dil Sun Raha Hain (This Heart Is Listening), and Emera singing Je Vole (I Fly).

Though Lartigau’s more modern take is much more musically accessible (let’s be honest, the film starts out with 2008 staple That’s Not My Name [1]), it’s also lighter. Bhansali’s story focuses a big chunk of his running time to tell the story of Manisha’s parents, also incredibly played by Nana Patekar and Seema Biswas, their struggle to raise a (hearing) child in near poverty levels, to the point that Patekar goes door to door with his daughter to make a living selling things.

Of course, both also have a love interest, and both Salman and Ilian Bergala are the weakest link.

I declare- DRAW!

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