Archives For Manga

Based on the manga by Fumi Yoshinaga, Ooku — refering to the quarters of the Shogun’s female companions — tells the story of a fictional Edo era in Japan where women have become the dominant members of society, and males are sought after to reproduce.

Actress Kou Shibasaki will be playing the female shogun.

This made me think of the comic Y: The Last Man, which was the first ever comic I got into due to my roommate wanting me to read it. If you haven’t read it, do give it a look. You can be blown away.

As for the movie, the trailer kinda game me chills. Kou Shibasaki as the Shogun, such a marvelous idea. What’s Kazunari Ninomiya to do? xD

Yu Aoi for Anan

June 4, 2010 — 1 Comment

Trivia bit?

This issue came out on March 2010. Yu also appears on the Anan covers for March 2009 and March 2008. And she’s got at least 5 Anan covers in total, though I dunno their dates.

How I noticed? I name my photoshoot files with name of magazine and date of publication, and if possible… photographer, though that usually happens with publications in English.

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Well, the Korea Herald article is specifically talking about Korean prime time television, but we all know Asia is big on the gay… being with Fan Service on promos, or by actually putting these pretty people on screen.

Min’s own film, which featured a gay pastry chef, serves as a case in point. According to Min, “Antique” drew an audience that ended up being around 86 percent female.

This might explain why the vast majority of homosexual or potentially gay characters are played by attractive actors like Zo In-sung (who starred in “A Frozen Flower”) or “Coffee Prince” heartthrob Kim Jae-wook (who starred in “Antique”).

Oh, and this topic is so totally Julz, who’s disappeared. I know she’s got a lot to comment about this topic. As for me, well… if everyone [at least in America or the UK] seem to exploit girl-on-girl — the last one to do so was Christina Aguilera on her NSFW video Not Myself Tonight, courtesy of Tudou because no one else would let me stream officially… SO SUCK IT, Aguilera’s record label — I’m all for boy-on-boy. I say it, if you’re going to be exploitative, then be exploitative with all.

And that thing about it being a trend? Well, Yaoi and Yuri have been around for what feels like forever. It doesn’t matter if it’s a trend or not, as long as it’s finally normalized.

Funny thing, I don’t know if it is because most my friends follow male groups, but I’ve never seen girl-on-girl kissing in Asia… seen a lot of boy-on-boy from everywhere there though. Having that, it was so weird to have Adam Lambert dude being criticized so badly on this side of the world.

I’ve seen a lot of girl-on-girl romantic tales of friendship that never went there… maybe because that’s what girls dream about a lot. Wonder why girls read so much Yuri and Yaoi xD

but it sure is time for YAM009 =D

is the cover kowaii??? [scary??] I would love to hear your opinion on fansubbing, as well as distribution, which are two topics I always bring up one way or the other.

You are also welcomed to comment on reviews and give suggestions.

With no further ado, go over here for download.

NHK ni Youkoso!

April 6, 2010 — Leave a comment

Based from the novel, and the manga series by the same same, Welcome to the NHK [which stands for most part of the series for Nihon Hikikomori Kyoukai or The Japanese Hikikomori Association] tells the story of a Hikikomori himself called Satou Tatsuhiro, a 20-something-year-old University drop-out who’s been living like a Hikikomori for almost 4 years of his life until an 18-year-old (?) girl named Misaki decides to take him on as a project and make Satou better of his social condition… as well as helping herself.

During the 24 episodes lasting 20 minutes [without opening and closing credits], we deal with a lot of what we’ve come to known as inherently Japanese odd behavior[though it’s really a global issue], including what we’ve learned to call the Japanese sub-culture of Otakus… Lolicon, video game culture, etc etc. However, we also deal with serious issues such as isolation, suicide and abuse – the last two often being such taboo topics in Asia or Latin America.

This animated series is what makes Japanese animation so avant-garde, in my opinion. Televised animation has hardly anything in its favor. They can’t ever boast on how great their graphics are, because they need to restrict their resources so they fit the budget… ultimately, animation as a medium is seen by many in America and, to a lesser extent, in Europe as a kiddies hobby. If the people often putting animated films and series down just because of  being animated could give Welcome to the NHK a chance, they’ll understand it better.

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