Archives For Spanish

If you bother to scan comments from Marit Larsen’s (or Marion’s) fandoms, you’d notice that she has a sizable following in South East Asia (Malaysia and Singapore pop up a lot), as well as Latin Americans (Mexico and Chile are the most frequent), and it just suddenly clicked to me why this might have happened. One of them is, of course, this clip of M2M singing the Mandarin version of their Shades of Purple single Pretty Boy. Then there’s the even rarer version of M2M’s Everything You Do [MV] in Spanish- aptly translated to Todo lo que Haces [MV].

My Mandarin is not perfect, but it sounds pretty okay… as does their Spanish. As the Japanese would say~~~ ah, natsukashii na.

Also~ I can’t wait for Marit’s new album.

It’s hard to imagine that it’s already been a year. A year since my dad’s passing. As I sit here writing this a whole week ahead of the events that happened a year ago, I see the signs, the memorable -or maybe not so memorable- but etched in my mind as the most important things we did together. The things we ate, the things we watched, listened to and laughed about. His smell of cigarettes and mint candy, the roughness of his coarse beard, yet the softness of his now-clipped hair. His laugh and his unique way of ringing my doorbell.They all seem so distant, yet so close to my heart.

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Papa, wo ai ni. Wo hen xiang ni.

It’s another double feature!

La Doña has been in the mood for fighting this week [1], and this time she’s taking Deepika Padukone- or I suppose El Peñon de las Animas (The Rock of Souls) is taking Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s Ram-Leela, where both balas and golis are exchanged nonchalantly, and music is spared in between two families that have been warring for generations.

penon-de-las-animas-ram-leela

Though Maria Felix is playing much more of a señorita role on this one (than usual), and this western musical (that’s what all rancheras are, right?) gets some pretty nifty cinematography and sassy moments and lyrics, there’s one thing that Ram-Leela has~~~ and that is Supriya Pathak.

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Are! Mashallah, mashallah~

Oh.mah.gosh.

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It’s a battle of the horse-riding sword-brandishing tough ladies that -actually- existed in real life, with lives brought onto the silver screen, beautified while being personified by THE faces of their own Golden Eras.

In the case of Greta Garbo, of course, with Hollywood in her most fun and most relaxed Queen Christina, often mistaken for a man and featuring the infamous scenes of Garbo kissing a lady and being romanced by John Gilbert while in mannish get-up. Then there’s the Mexican and Latin movie classic diva La Doña Maria Felix as Catalina Erauso, escaping a convent and dragging it up as Don Alonso, making the ladies of the Peruvian Viceroyalty swoon in La Monja Alferez, with a twist ending to match Some Like It Hot.

And to quote Toni Collette:

We’re women dressed as men dressed as women!

This is a tough one. I do have a terrible Greta Garbo bias, but I think I’m handing it down to La Doña on this one. Maria Felix is like the awesome fusion of everything that’s good with both Greta Garbo and Joan Crawford.

It’s always interesting to see educational (short) clips about different languages; did you guys ever see the one about the guy that could speak like 20 languages? At that time, my niece (6) and nephew (5) were struggling with picking up Italian and English at school, while they spoke Spanish and Swedish at home. That was, of course, on top of their other school subjects like math, because schooling is just incredibly ridiculous nowadays.

The only bad thing about the clip is the incredibly boring tone of the voice over. In any case, I thought it was funny they lumped Mandarin, Cantonese, etc into one big chunk of Chinese language. I thought the formal label was “Sino-Tibetan language,” even though Tibetan feels more like it would be more like Indo-Aryan, no? Isn’t Sanskrit both part of Tibetan and Indo-Aryan languages? Sighs.

I don’t exactly understand how branching works with languages, how does Indo-European come about? Isn’t that like stretching things out? What would languages like Spanish, German and Hindi have in common with each other? And how does Japonic or Koreanic come about? And how do they have more in common with Mongolian than with Chinese?

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